Reasearch Activities in the Lab:

vars tool

Global sensitivity analysis is a systems theoretic approach to characterizing the overall (average) sensitivity of one or more model responses across the factor space, by attributing the variability of those responses to different controlling (but uncertain) factors (e.g., model parameters, forcings, and boundary and initial conditions).

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Large Scale Watershed Modelling

We conduct fundamental and applied research for advanced watershed modelling, with a focus on cold regions. Our modelling efforts mostly involve the MESH (Modélisation Environmentale–Surface et Hydrologie) modelling framework. MESH is a distributed physically-based coupled land surface-Hydrology model developed by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) for various water management purposes at large scales.

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Coupling Water Management and Land Surface Models

To date, rigorous modelling efforts of water management and hydrology have typically been in mutual isolation. This project attempts to integrate the two in a fully coupled modelling platform, where details of water management/regulation (e.g., reservoir operation, irrigation, other diversions, and water allocation) are simulated within a land surface-hydrology model.

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Precipitation Uncertainty Across Canadian Watersheds

Precipitation is a vital element of the water and energy cycles and a key forcing variable in driving hydrological models. The availability of accurate precipitation measurements are useful in many applications, such as climate change and/or land use changes, natural hazards, agricultural and environmental studies, and hydrological and water resource planning.

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GUI_3

In the Watershed Systems Analysis and Modelling lab, we are developing a web-based graphical user interface (GUI), to help stakeholders, decision makers, and more importantly, the public, to better understand the water resources system of Saskatchewan. This GUI is coupled with a water resources management model for Saskatchewan, called SWAMP.

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